Must-Read Literature for Black History Month

Too Heavy a Load, Book Cover Too Heavy a Load celebrates this century’s rich history of black women defending themselves, from Ida B. Wells to Anita Hill. Although most prominently a history of the century-long struggle against racism and male chauvinism, Deborah Gray White also movingly illuminates black women’s painful struggle to hold their racial and gender identities intact while feeling the inexorable pull of the agendas of white women and black men.

 

 

 


Ida Wells-Barnett, Book Cover In the tradition of towering biographies that tell us as much about America as they do about their subject, Ida: A Sword Among Lions is a sweeping narrative about a country and a crusader embroiled in the struggle against lynching: a practice that imperiled not only the lives of black men and women, but also a nation based on law and riven by race.

 

 

 


Freedoms Daughters, Book Cover Who What When Where Why, These are just a few of the questions asked and answered in this book. It’s a book that people should refer to often. The Unsung Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement 1830 – 1970, by Lynne Olson.

 

 

 

 

 


Freedom's Teacher, Book Cover Septima Clark just look at her life and the quite impact she had.

In the mid-1950s, Septima Poinsette Clark (1898-1987), a former public school teacher, developed a citizenship training program that enabled thousands of African Americans to register to vote and then to link the power of the ballot to concrete strategies for individual and communal empowerment.

 

 

 


Sisters in the Struggle, Book Cover “If Bettye Collier-Thomas and V.P. Franklin had only gathered together a distinguished group of scholars to document the role woman played in the black freedom movement, their contribution would be immense. But Sisters in the Struggle is more than an acknowledgement and celebration of black woman’s activism. It is a major revision of history, revealing that black women were the critical thinkers, strategists, fighters, and dreamers of the movement. Black feminists developed a social vision expansive enough to emancipate us all.” – Robin D.G. Kelley,author of Race Rebels: Culture, Politics, and the Black Working Class