Events

Garden Party – August 9, 2014

July 20 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Black Women for Wellness 2014 Garden Party Flyer

Black Women for Wellness 2014 Garden Party Flyer


Time: 2:30 PM – 5:00PM
Address: Community Build Garden, 4305 S. Degnan Blvd., Los Angeles CA 90008
Call: (323) 290-5955
Opening Libations, Spoken Word, Drumming & Movement, Local Vendors, Keynote Presentation, African Centered Fashion Show, Health Care Info, Great Food, BWW Tea, Silent Auction, Good People & Fierce Women

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BWW Lobby Training – July 12, 2014

June 20 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Unleash Your Power

Learn:

1) How to present issues that we care about to elected officials

2) The tools to be effective lobbyists to hold elected officials accountable

Time: 10AM – 3:30PM
Address: SCOPE Office, 1715 W. Florence Avenue, Los Angeles CA 90047

Reserve Your Spot:

Email: Krissy@bwwla.com
Call: (323) 290-5955

Lunch and Snacks Provided

 

 

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Black Women for Wellness Annual Conference – September 24, 2014

June 20 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Each year Black Women for Wellness (BWW) holds an annual conference to provide an open forum and space to highlight the health status of black women and girls.

The complex lives of black women has been written about by the likes of Maya Angelou to Melissa Harris Perry. Black women’s presence, space, bodies have been analyzed and critiqued and although no experience is the same, there is a certain amount of shifting that Black women do that affects the type of interactions and experiences we have with others in our society.

With constantly shifting to the ideals of society, black women’s health is being compromised both physically and emotionally. Given the disproportionately high health issues black women face, and the urgency to address black women’s health, BWW is focusing this year’s conference on transforming silence into action, framed in a discussion around reproductive and sexual health, rights and justice.

Read the Abstract Here

Time: 8:30AM – 5:00PM
Address: The California Endowment, 1000 N. Alameda St., Los Angeles CA 90012

Purchase Tickets Here

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Local Voices Phone Series

May 16 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Black Women for Wellness Local Voices Phone Series May 20th - 22nd

Make Your Voice Matter. Vote June 3rd!

Come by and talk to community members about voting on June 3rd, your experience at BWW and how people can become involved with the BWW community.

Food and beverages will be provided.

For more information and to sign-up please RSVP to Krissy Leahy, Civic Engagement Program Coordinator, at krissy@bwwla.com or call 323.290.5955.

Where: Black Women for Wellness
4340 11th Ave, Los Angeles 90008
When: 4:30 – 8pm

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June 13, 2014 – Bring a Brother to Breakfast

May 15 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Black Women for Wellness Bring a Brother to Breakfast June 2014

  • BLOOM – California Community Foundation
    • Building A  Lifetime of Options and Opportunities for Men
  • Boys & Men of Color Initiative – The California Endowment
    • Health Happens for Our Sons & Brothers
  • Brothers, Sons, Selves – The Liberty Hill Foundation
  • My Brother’s Keeper – The White House Initiative

Bring A Brother 2 Breakfast members, participants, brother friends and panel members will dialog on the issues challenging us, programs initiated and solutions to the crisis facing Black communities. Health, education, employment and justice will center our conversation as we share resources, references and information with community members.


  • WHO: Black Women for Wellness & members inviting a brother to breakfast
  • TIME: 8:30 – 11:00am
  • Location: 4030 Crenshaw Blvd Los Angeles CA 90008 (DWP Auditorium/free parking)
  • Cost: Free with RSVP (however donations are sincerely appreciated)
  • Each Sisters @ Eight program features:
    • Hot Topics /Member Highlights / Healthy Eating / Networking & Collaboration
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The Wangari Maathai Environmental Justice Award Presented to Martha Dina Argüello

March 7 in Events, News, Press Release by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Every Step We Take: Martha Dina Argüello Honored for Making Strides in Global Environmental Justice

Human progress is neither automatic nor inevitable… Every step toward the goal of justice requires sacrifice, suffering, and struggle; the tireless exertions and passionate concern of dedicated individuals. – Martin Luther King Jr.

Black Women for Wellness (BWW) is honoring Martha Dina Argüello on Saturday, March 8th at its International Women’s Day Food & Wine Tasting and Award Ceremony. The event, Every Step We Take, will acknowledge excellence in leadership for activists defending women’s issues on the international landscape and celebrate cultural diversity in a food tasting spectacular featuring dishes created from international inspiration.

BWW chose Argüello, Executive Director of Physicians for Social Responsibility-Los Angeles (PSR-LA), to receive the “Wangari Muta Maathai” Environmental Justice Award because of her 32 years of serving in the non-profit sector as an advocate, community organizer and coalition builder. The award is named after the Kenyan human rights and environmental justice advocate best known for the Green Belt Movement which assisted women in planting more than 20 million trees on their farms and on schools and church compounds in order to conserve the environment and improve their quality of life.

While working as a health educator in the 1990s, Argüello realized that although early detection can prevent death from breast cancer, it does not prevent breast cancer, which has been increasingly linked to the exposure of environmental toxicants. Since that realization, Martha has dedicated her career to the environmental justice movement, and has lectured nationwide on the use of precautionary principle policies.  “Looking at the intersection of environmental justice and reproductive health and justice is important,” Argüello states, “because reducing exposure to toxic chemicals in our environment will have a great impact on the health of women and girls.”

BWW recently had the pleasure to interview the 2014 International Women’s Day award recipient.

How do you define Environmental Justice?

“EJ is environmental racism. We need to call out what’s happening with poor and low-income communities and people of color and the general outlook that they are disposable and challenge the idea that their health is less important than the economic gains of companies and institutions that are responsible for toxic chemicals in our environment. From a health perspective, health disparities and inequalities are definitely related to environmental toxicants.”

What do you think is the intersection of EJ with reproductive justice and/or women’s health/issues?

“Many chemicals – air pollutants, chemicals in personal and everyday products, toxic release from refineries, chemicals used in oil extraction and  fracking, just to name a few – impact our health. But our communities are treated as a massive experiment. Some of these chemicals are endocrine disruptors and affect the reproductive health of women and men.  Hispanic, African-American, and Asian/Pacific Islander mothers experience higher levels of air pollution and were more than twice as likely to live in the most polluted counties.”

Why is it important to think globally while acting locally?

“Locally, we need to engage and organize our communities and demand that public agencies make preventing harm a priority.   At the city-level, we need more information about the contamination in our communities and ensure that as the city pushes more development that we are not building homes, schools or growing our food on contaminated land.  At the state level and national level we have to keep up a constant drumbeat that people’s health is worth protecting.”

The award is named after Wangari Mute Maathai…does this award have any special meaning for you?

“Yes, she is a great inspiration. I met her on her book tour when she came to Los Angeles. We share a mentor David Chatfield who helped her get one of her first jobs  in the field.  He was my co supervisor in my first job working on pesticides and health issues 15 years ago.”

What accomplishment are you most proud of so far?

“I am proud of the programs that we’ve built at PSR-LA and the alliances we have created.   I am particularly proud of the partnership we have developed with Black Women for Wellness to address the intersection of reproductive justice and environmental health.  I’m really proud of the work of my co- worker, Ana Mascareñas , on the issues of toxic flame retardants.”

How does the work of PSR-LA influence the global lives of women and girls?

“One example is our work to eliminate the unnecessary use of highly toxic flame retardant chemicals.  These chemicals make their way into the bodies of women and girls and because they migrate through our ecosystem, they end up concentrating in our food.  I met women in Alaska who traditional way of life and indigenous diets are threatened because these flame-retardants bio accumulate in their food systems and then in their bodies, including in breast milk.  So making couches fire safe without chemicals can be done and doing so may mean that indigenous women in Alaska can protect their health and traditional culture.”

BWW’s International Women’s Day event – Every Step We Take – will be held at the Los Angeles Turner Center in Westchester from 5pm until 8pm. For more information on sponsorships, tickets or program ad placements please contact Willie Duncan at willie@bwwla.com or 323.290.5955.

Black Women for Wellness is a multi-generational, membership-based organization committed to the well-being of Black women and girls by building healthy communities through health education, empowerment and advocacy. For more information, please visit www.bwwla.org

PSR-LA is a physician and health advocate membership organization working to protect public health from nuclear threats and environmental toxins. Representing over 5,000 physicians, health professionals, and concerned residents in Southern California, we inform the medical community and policymakers about toxic threats, promote safer practices and strengthen local community organizations to engage in meaningful public health and environmental advocacy. http://www.psr-la.org/

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The Ida B Wells Barnett Award Presented to Shanelle Matthews

March 7 in Events, News, Press Release by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Shanelle Matthews is a journalist, blogger and all-around digital enthusiast. She is the the Communications Strategist at the ACLU of Northern California where she is tasked with creating visibility for the legal and programmatic work happening on the ground. Shanelle writes on the intersections of race, gender, and sexual orientation and has been published in a wide variety of magazines and newspapers including Women’s eNews, The Root, Feministing, RH Reality Check and The Frisky. She studied new and online media at the Manship School of Mass Communications and is on the board of directors of the National Network of Abortion Funds. She is also co-editor of Birthing Justice — Saving Our Lives, an forthcoming anthology of critical essays and personal testimonies exploring childbirth from a radical social justice perspective.

Why are women leaders needed to impact change in the world?

It is certainly true that no movement is complete without women and no movement makes progress or realizes success without leadership from women. The construct of both change and impact only exist because women exist.

What was your path to leadership and what difference did/does your leadership made/make?

My “path to leadership” was never quite called that. I stumbled upon “my path” when I moved from California to the deep South. I had never experienced a more oppressive environment and was moved by both the resilience and the apathy I saw. I then accepted and embraced black feminism and it’s framework as my life’s work. The difference my leadership has made is subjective, depending wholly on the person or persons influenced or affected by it . I can’t pretend to know.

Who were you mentors and role models?

It wasn’t until later in my advocacy that I realized I ever had mentors. The formal relationship of mentor/mentee was never established. My parents instilled in me a sense of work ethic; they were no-nonsense kind of people who used every opportunity as a teachable moment. In high school, my English teacher and track coach, John Marshall unbeknownst to me inspired in me a love for self, a self-awareness I didn’t know I was missing. In college there were professors and administrators who imparted a sense of curated enthusiasm on me — who encouraged me to pick my battles. The formal relationship of mentor/mentee is a concept lost on my generation, not because of a lack of want but because the landscape of competitiveness does provide space for teaching opportunities.

The social media award is named after Ida B. Wells…does this award have any special meaning for you?

Ida B. Wells is and was an important contributor to the plight for black liberation and feminism, a commitment I’ve also made. I was first introduced to Wells in college while reading When and Where I Enter by Paula Giddings — I was a journalism student, her work felt especially resonant.

How do you define social media’s role in the fight for women’s issues locally and/or globally?

I’ve committed my life to using media as a tool for social change because I believe it can foster a future where the traditionally disenfranchised and oppressed can have their voices heard, their needs met and the support they so desperately deserve. I chose social justice media because it is uniquely sensitive to the needs of marginalized communities, from which I come.

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The Coretta Scott King Civic Engagement Award Presented to U.S. Representative Karen Bass

March 7 in Events, News, Press Release by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Congressmember Karen Bass was re-elected to her second term representing the newly drawn 37th Congressional District in November 2012. In Congress she has been an outspoken advocate for balanced fiscal policies that preserve the social guarantee to our seniors and invest in the future. Congressmember Bass serves on the House Committee on Foreign Affairs where she is Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights and International Organizations. As a member of the House Judiciary Committee, Representative Bass is also working to craft sound criminal justice reforms as well as protect intellectual property right infringements that threaten the economic health of the 37th District.

She was selected by Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi to serve on the prestigious Steering and Policy Committee, which sets the policy direction of the Democratic Caucus. Congressmember Bass is also playing a leadership role in the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC), where she serves as Whip for the 113th Congress. Only in her second term, Congressmember Bass is solidifying leadership positions on two issues very close to her heart: reforming America’s foster care system and strengthening the United States’ relationship with Africa. In her first term, Congressmember Bass created the bipartisan Congressional Caucus on Foster Youth along with co-chair U.S. Representative Tom Marino (R-Pa.), and intends to examine national standards of care in the child welfare system.

In January, President Obama signed into law the Uninterrupted Scholars Act (USA) which was the first major piece of legislation shepherded through the House under the Caucus’ leadership. USA makes it easier for caregivers to access educational records so they can assist foster youth with school enrollment and provide additional academic support in an effort to reduce school dropout rates. Since 2012, she has joined Members of the Caucus for a Nationwide Foster Youth Listening Tour travelling the nation to examine best practices and the challenging conditions that foster youth face in our country. She is also a co-chair of the bipartisan, bicameral Congressional Coalition on Adoption.

On Africa, Congressmember Bass acted swiftly during her first term to bring legislators, advocacy groups and international leaders together to extend the third country fabric provision of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA). The provision supports stability, development, and economic growth of sub-Saharan African countries by protecting jobs in the apparel sector and providing some of the best markets for American businesses to sell their goods and services.

In an effort to be responsive to the people in her district, Congressmember Bass created the Congressional Council, which provides an opportunity for constituents to learn firsthand about the issues in Congress and how to become involved in the legislative process. The Council, composed of all volunteers, seeks to engage other District residents in public policy, both domestic and internationally.

Prior to serving in Congress, Congressmember Bass made history when the California Assembly elected her to be its 67th Speaker, catapulting her to become the first African American woman in U.S. history to serve in this powerful state legislative role. Congressmember Bass served as speaker during California’s greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression. In addition to helping to navigate the state through a very difficult time, she also championed efforts to improve foster care and quality healthcare for Californians. Also, under her leadership the Assembly fast-tracked federal economic stimulus legislation that aided Californians who have been affected by the national economic crisis as well as jumpstarted billions of dollars of infrastructure projects.

Before serving as an elected official, Congressmember Bass became interested in community activism as a child watching the Civil Rights Movement with her father. It was at that time that she made a lifetime commitment to effecting social change in her community and abroad. She worked for nearly a decade as a Physician Assistant and served as a clinical instructor at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine Physician Assistant Program.

In 1990, in response to the crisis that was gripping inner city America, which in Los Angeles was crack-cocaine and gang violence, Congressmember Bass started and ran the Community Coalition, a community-based social justice organization in South Los Angeles that empowers residents to become involved in making a difference. Through her leadership at the Community Coalition, Congressmember Bass worked to address the drug and violence epidemic and to engage community residents in addressing the root causes of injustice.

Congressmember Bass had one daughter, Emilia Bass-Lechuga and son-in-law Michael Wright. She continues to be inspired by Emilia and Michael’s passion for life. Emilia planned to follow in her mother’s footsteps working for social change. Congressmember Bass also has four step children.

She grew up with three brothers in the Venice/Fairfax area of Los Angeles and is the only daughter of DeWitt and Wilhelmina Bass. She graduated from Hamilton High School, Cal State Dominguez Hills, and the University of Southern California’s School of Medicine Physician Assistant Program.

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The Ida B Wells Social Media Award Presented to Divinity Matovu

March 7 in Events, News by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Divinity Matovu is an honors graduate of the University of Southern California (’08) and the School for International Training World Learning Program (’07). She holds degrees in Political Science and African Studies and has had the privilege of studying in the United States of America, Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania.

After having a transformative experience while studying in East Africa as a college senior, Divinity decided to follow her passion for education, youth empowerment, human rights, gender equity and African culture by co-founding the Amagezi Gemaanyi Youth Association (AGYA) in Uganda. From 2008 – 2011, Divinity served as AGYA’s Executive Director. In this role, Divinity managed implementation of AGYA’s core arts and education programs and special projects which impacted more than 2,000 youth living in urban poverty in Uganda. She has secured funding and other support from donors like the United Nations Urban Youth Fund, the African Millennium Foundation, and the Clinton Foundation.

Divinity is a past honoree of Glamour Magazine’s Annual Woman of the Year Awards where she was featured as one of 20 Amazing Women in Their 20′s Who Are Already Changing The World. Divinity was a Finalist for the 2010 DoSomething Award, a $100,000 grant for the nation’s top social entrepreneurs under age 25. In addition to her work as a social entrepreneur, Divinity has been awarded for her scholarship on the study of hip-hop youth culture in Africa. She also authored a chapter on “Authentic Leadership” in Just BE Cause, an e-book about social entrepreneurship which was released in Fall 2013.

Divinity currently lives in Los Angeles and serves as Director of Operations & Administration for a prestigious Beverly Hills law firm. Divinity also works as a freelance private consultant on various youth development projects in both Africa and the United States. She is an active member of the Diaspora African Women’s Network.

1. Are women leaders needed to impact change in the world?

Yes, women leaders are needed to impact change. Women bring a perspective that is necessary. For myself, being a new mom I see how my outlook on the world has changed since becoming a mom. Even women who are not moms. I think that having that feminine, and feminist, perspective can really balance any discussion. Having women on a team or in leadership of a nonprofit organization or even a for-profit company, people are starting to realize that those voices need to be part of the conversation. Even in our political institutions, I believe more women continue to rise as we break down barriers and challenge stigmas that stereotype women.

2. What was your path to leadership and what difference did/does your leadership made/make?

My path to leadership was growing up with a single mom. I am the oldest of five so I was thrown into leadership positions ever since I can remember. I had to prepare dinner while my mom worked and help my siblings with their homework before starting mine. My mom had to work to pay the bills and I was next in line. So leadership was developed early in me. When I was in high school I was one of the very few African American students at my private, college prep school. It was a great school but there were not a lot of people who looked like me. And that inspired me to pursue leadership roles so I could dispel stereotypes, bring a different viewpoint into decisions that were being made that affected me and my community. In college, I poised myself to find my passion. Then, I was able to combine my passion with my leadership abilities that were fostered since I was young. I realized I wanted to commit myself to the empowerment of women and girls. During my senior year, I studied abroad in Africa (Kenya and Tanzania) and everything came together. I wanted to have an international focus and to live and work in East Africa. I wanted to have an impact on education and enrichment opportunities for girls who didn’t even have the opportunity to go to public schools like we do in the States.

3. Who were you mentors and role models?

One of my greatest mentors is also my boss, Fred Dorton. I met him in 2006 when I competed in a beauty pageant at USC and he was one of the judges. During the pageant I talked about how I wanted to be a leader and advance civil and women’s rights. Afterwards, he gave me his card and said we had to talk. Ever since then, Dorton has been instrumental in supporting me and shaping access to resources and opportunities. He’s an advocate for young professional African Americans who seek to be leaders in their communities. My grandmother, Ruby Doris, is my role model. I look to her because she showed me how to be a strong women. She’s not formally educated but she is the smartest women I know. She’s a strong women of faith and commitment to her marriage and children. It’s an honor to make her proud with the work I have been able to do thus far.

4. Why is it important to think globally while acting locally?

Sometimes for the African American community, we can forget that we are part of this larger Diaspora of people who are descendants of Africa. I was definitely one of those people until was able to travel to the continent. I made me feel that I was part of something greater than myself. In today’s world, social media like Twitter allows us to connect instantly with others around the world. The world is becoming global. If we do not acknowledge that and leverage that, then we are missing out.

5. The leadership award is named after Dorothy Height…does this award have any special meaning or you?

Absolutely, Dorothy Height is a pioneer of the civil rights movement and her career expanded decades. I feel so humbled to be getting an award named after her. I only hope that my work thus far and the work I’ll do in the future can compare in any way to all the great strides that she help advance for people who were denied access to their civil rights and for Black women in particular. She is an icon. I am humbled and honored.

6. What accomplishment are you most proud of so far?

Graduating from college. I was a first generation graduate and the expectation in my family was not very high. My family thought it was so great just to apply and get in. To graduate from college and be at the top of my class at USC was such a significant accomplishment because my siblings and all my cousins know now that I can do it, they can also. All my cousins want to go to USC because I did and I think that positive. Growing up, I didn’t know anything about colleges and universities. For my daughter, it’s not even a question. College is the goal. I’m feel so blessed that I able to break the cycle in my family and set a new standard for my family.

7. If you could meet/have a conversation with any female activist/leader (dead or living) who would it be and what would be your first question?

Michelle Obama, for sure. I think that’s still a possibility in life depending on where my career takes me. I would ask her the best parenting advice she could give me for raining such beautiful and well-spoken and well-behaved daughter in a society that doesn’t value Black women. She has done such a good job while balancing the demands of being First Lady. I, of course, would then have more professional questions but that is the first the comes to mind.

8. How did the work of Amagezi Gemaanyi Youth Association (AGYA) influence the global lives of women and girls?

Amagezi Gemaanyi means “knowledge is power.” The girls that I worked with had never seen a women on a laptop or running a business. Even though I was an “outsider” in some ways, they were able to relate to me as a Black woman. It gave them the confidence that if “Mama Divinity” could do it, so could they. It was their first exposure. After three years of the program, girls who were so scared to voice their opinion were now leading debates. They were making decisions about running the organization because it was youth-led. By the end of the program they were advocating for themselves and advocating for other girls in their community. One of our shiniest example was a girl named “Happy.” She was so shy when she first came to us. But by the end of the program, she was our youth ambassador to the Ministry of Gender in Uganda. She was in meetings with top government officials and she held her own. I was so proud of her. I saw attitudes of confidence and empowerment come into fruition. Our organization was the reason for that.

9. How were the girls in Uganda similar to the girls in Los Angeles?

Well, they looked similar. You couldn’t tell if you were in Leimert Part or Kamuli Uganda. Everywhere I went I saw reflections of myself. I saw reflections of young women here. Big picture, there are a lot of freedoms and access to opportunities that young girls here have that girls in Uganda wish they could have. One example, our public school system is not perfect. But in Uganda all schools are private and many families cannot afford to send their daughters to school. The girls in Uganda were ecstatic to get their school tuition paid in full. But in Uganda, giving a girl an education is usually not considered a good investment. The thirst for education is so raw and so ripe in Uganda. What those kids wouldn’t give for the opportunity to attend school for free through high school.

10. What international women’s issue is most important to you right now?

Female genital mutilation. A lot of local women are doing a lot of good work in African communities that still practice it to educate their peers on the dangers and health risks of this practice. Because FGM is becoming more taboo, places that are still practicing it are doing it underground and that’s dangerous. There’s no health benefit to it.

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International Women’s Day Pop Quiz Answers

March 6 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments
  • International Women’s Day was first known under what name in 1909 and in what country?

International Women’s Day (IWD) originally began as National Woman’s Day and was observed across the United States on February 28, 1909.

  • What specific issues were women fighting for in 1909?

The women demanded shorter working hours, better pay and voting rights.

  • In 1911, the first International Women’s Day was honored in what four countries?

International Women’s Day (IWD) was honored the first time in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland on March 19, 1911. More than one million women and men attended IWD rallies campaigning for women’s rights to work, vote, be trained, to hold public office and end discrimination.

  • Nowadays, some countries celebrate International Women’s Day in a manner to similar to what celebrated day in the U.S.?

Some countries celebrate IWD in the same manner that we celebrate Mother’s Day. Children give small presents to their mothers and grandmothers.

  • The United Nations delegate what year as the International Women’s Year?

The United Nations designated 1975 “International Women’s Year.” That year the first World Conference on Women was held in Mexico City. The 1975 conference and International Women’s Year were part of the United Nations’ Decade of Women (1976-85).

We hope you enjoyed our pop quiz. How did you do?

Join Us for the 2014 International Women’s Day “Global Food and Wine Pairings” event!

Our event is being held at the Los Angeles Turner Center. It is a cultural event center located in Westchester. We can’t wait to see everything in action on our big night. We hope to see you there!

Enjoy an evening featuring Kitchen Diva chefs offering global cuisines paired with international wines, network with people working locally impacting globally on the issues important to women & girls, support with your donation the work of Black Women for Wellness.

Date:
March 8, 2014 (Saturday)
5:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Location:
Los Angeles Turner Center
8946 Sepulveda Eastway
Los Angeles CA 90045

Purchase Tickets Here:

– Tickets $75.00
– VIP Reception $100.00

  • Order using check or money order

Make payable to Black Women for Wellness
P.O. Box 292516
Los Angeles, CA 90029

  • Call 323 290 5955 to order by phone

Adults only (must be 21+ to participate)

Click here to Sponsor the Event

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International Women’s Day 2014 Pop Quiz

March 6 in Events, News by Kristina Meyers No Comments
  • International Women’s Day was first known under what name in 1909 and in what country?
  • What specific issues were women fighting for in 1909?
  • In 1911, the first International Women’s Day was honored in what four countries?
  • Nowadays, some countries celebrate International Women’s Day in a manner to similar to what celebrated day in the U.S.?
  • The United Nations delegate what year as the International Women’s Year?

Join Us for the 2014 International Women’s Day “Global Food and Wine Pairings” event!

Enjoy an evening featuring Kitchen Diva chefs offering global cuisines paired with international wines, network with people working locally impacting globally on the issues important to women & girls, support with your donation the work of Black Women for Wellness.

Date:
March 8, 2014 (Saturday)
5:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Location:
Los Angeles Turner Center
8946 Sepulveda Eastway
Los Angeles CA 90045

Purchase Tickets Here:

– Tickets $75.00
– VIP Reception $100.00

  • Order using check or money order

Make payable to Black Women for Wellness
P.O. Box 292516
Los Angeles, CA 90029

  • Call 323 290 5955 to order by phone

Adults only (must be 21+ to participate)

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The History of International Women’s Day

March 6 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

International Women’s Day (IWD) originally began as National Woman’s Day and was observed across the United States on February 28, 1909 as women demanded shorter working hours, better pay and voting rights. In 1910, the second International Conference of Working Women was held in Copenhagen. A German woman named a Clara Zetkin proposed that every year in every country there should be a celebration on the same day – a Women’s Day – to be unified in their demands. The conference was attended by over 100 women from 17 countries and they represented unions, socialist parties, working women’s clubs and included the first three women elected to the Finnish parliament. The group unanimously approved the suggestion, taking the first steps towards the International Women’s Day we know today.

International Women’s Day (IWD) was honored the first time in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland on March 19, 1911. More than one million women and men attended IWD rallies campaigning for women’s rights to work, vote, be trained, to hold public office and end discrimination. However, on March 25, the tragic ‘Triangle Fire’ in New York City took the lives of more than 140 working women and drew attention to working conditions and labor legislation in the United States. These important issues became a focus of subsequent International Women’s Day events.

Since then, International Women’s Day has grown to become a global day of recognition and celebration around the world. The United Nations made 1975 ‘International Women’s Year’. That year the first World Conference on Women was held in Mexico City. The 1975 conference and International Women’s Year were part of the United Nations’ Decade of Women (1976–85). The United Nations held its Fifth Conference on Women in March 2012. These conferences are used to coordinate international efforts for women’s rights and participation in social, political and economic processes. Since 1975, Governments and women’s organizations around the world have observed IWD annually on March 8th by holding events that honor women’s advancement and focusing on the continued steps and action required to ensure that women’s rights are realized in everyday life.

IWD is now an official holiday in Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, China (for women only), Cuba, Georgia, Guinea-Bissau, Eritrea, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Madagascar (for women only), Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Nepal (for women only), Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam and Zambia. On this day, men honor their mothers, wives, girlfriends, colleagues, etc with flowers and small gifts. In some countries IWD is celebrated like Mother’s Day where children give small presents to their mothers and grandmothers.

The political and human rights theme designated by the United Nations has been adopted by other regions and countries. Activists and leaders strive to bring political and social awareness of the struggles of women worldwide to the forefront by celebrating achievements, highlighting important world events and focusing on problems still needed to be addressed. Thousands of events are held throughout the world to inspire women.

The United States now designates the whole month of March as “Women’s History Month.”

Black Women for Wellness is not only proud to take part in International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month each year but is also committed to striving for the civic, reproductive, environmental and health rights of women and girls every day. Every step we take at BWW and every effort we undertake is towards the goal of health and wellness of our communities.

Click here to take the International Women’s Day Quiz!

Enjoy an evening featuring Kitchen Diva chefs offering global cuisines paired with international wines, network with people working locally impacting globally on the issues important to women & girls, support with your donation the work of Black Women for Wellness.

Date:
March 8, 2014 (Saturday)
5:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Location:
Los Angeles Turner Center
8946 Sepulveda Eastway
Los Angeles CA 90045

Click here to Sponsor the Event

Purchase Tickets Here:

– Tickets $75.00
– VIP Reception $100.00

  • Order using check or money order

Make payable to Black Women for Wellness
P.O. Box 292516
Los Angeles, CA 90029

  • Call 323 290 5955 to order by phone

Adults only (must be 21+ to participate)

Click here to Sponsor the Event

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Black Women for Wellness – International Women’s Day 2014 – Honoring Female Icons

March 6 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Date:
March 8, 2014 (Saturday)
5:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Location:
Los Angeles Turner Center
8946 Sepulveda Eastway
Los Angeles CA 90045

Join us as we celebrate these influential female icons.

Wangari Muta Mathaai

Wangari Muta Mathaai, awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004, was a Kenyan human rights and environmental justice advocate best known for the Green Belt Movement which assisted women in planting more than 20 million trees on their farms and on schools and church compounds in order to conserve the environment and improve their quality of life.

She was born in Nyeri, Kenya in 1940. She was the first woman in East and Central Africa to earn a doctorate degree, obtaining a Ph.D. in 1971 from the University of Nairobi where she also taught veterinary anatomy. She became chair of the Department of Veterinary Anatomy and an associate professor in 1976 and 1977 respectively. In both cases, she was the first woman to attain those positions in the region. Wangari was active in the National Council of Women of Kenya in 1976-87 and was its chairman in 1981-87. While she served in the National Council of Women she introduced the idea of planting trees with the people in 1976 and continued to develop it into a broad-based, grassroots organization whose main focus is the planting of trees with women groups in order to conserve the environment and improve their quality of life. However, through the Green Belt Movement she has assisted women in planting more than 20 million trees on their farms and on schools and church compounds. In 1986, the Movement established a Pan African Green Belt Network and has exposed over 40 individuals from other African countries to the approach. Countries that have successfully launched such initiatives in Africa (Tanzania, Uganda, Malawi, Lesotho, Ethiopia, Zimbabwe, etc).

Wangari is internationally recognized for her persistent struggle for democracy, human rights and environmental conservation. She and the Green Belt Movement was awarded The 2004 Nobel Peace Prize. She has won other numerous awards and was listed on UNEP’s Global 500 Hall of Fame and named one of the 100 heroines of the world. In December 2002, she was elected to parliament with an overwhelming 98% of the vote. She was subsequently appointed by the president, as Assistant Minister for Environment, Natural Resources and Wildlife in Kenya’s ninth parliament.
Unfortunately, Wangari Maathai died from complications of ovarian cancer on 25 September 2011.

Coretta Scott King

Coretta Scott King, the wife of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr, was an important and influential civil and human rights activist, accomplished author and respected public figure in her own right.

Coretta was born in Heiberger, Alabama in 1927. An equal partner with her husband, Coretta took part in the Montgomery Bus Boycott of 1955, journeyed to Ghana to mark that nation’s independence in 1957, traveled to India on a pilgrimage in 1959 and worked to pass the 1964 Civil Rights Act, among other civil-rights-related work.

As part of her own efforts, she worked as a public mediator and as a liaison to peace and justice organizations. After her husband’s death, she founded the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, based in Atlanta, Georgia, and served as the center’s president and chief executive officer from its inception until 1995. She oversaw local, national and international programs that trained tens of thousands of people in Dr. King’s philosophy and methods, promoting civil rights work through the globe. She spent 15 years striving to make Dr. King’s birthday a national holiday succeeding in 1983. The holiday is now a national phenomenon that continues to highlight the civil rights movement for women, men and children throughout the United States.

Mrs. King served the cause of justice and human rights throughout her life. She traveled took all over the world on goodwill missions to Africa, Latin America, Europe and Asia. In 1983, she marked the 20th anniversary of the historic March on Washington, by leading a gathering of more than 800 human rights organizations, the Coalition of Conscience, in the largest demonstration the capital city had seen up to that time. She also fought for AIDS education and authored many articles about social issues.

A life-long advocate of interracial coalitions, formed several in addition to the Coalition of Conscience. In 1974 Mrs. King, as Co-Chair of both the National Committee for Full Employment and the Full Employment Action Council, formed a broad coalition of over 100 religious, labor, business, civil and women’s rights organizations dedicated to a national policy of full employment and equal economic opportunity. She held other leadership roles in the political arena, nationally and internationally.

Coretta Scott King died in 2006 from complications of ovarian cancer.

Ida B. Wells

Ida B. Wells was a fierce investigative journalist and anti-lynching advocate who created and promoted international awareness of the civil and human rights injustices towards African-Americans in the late 1800s and early 1900s, specifically lynching. She traveled several times to Europe and other countries to describe the horrors of lynching to international pressure on the United States government to actively stop lynching.

Born a slave in Holly Springs, Mississippi in 1862 just before President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, Ida grew up to become a leader in the civil rights movement. She attended different collage as she worked as an elementary school teacher to support her younger siblings after the death of their parents. While teaching, Wells was offered an editorial position for the Evening Star. She also wrote weekly articles for The Living Way weekly newspaper under the pen name “Iola” and gained a reputation for writing about the race issue. In 1889, she became co-owner and editor of Free Speech and Headlight, an anti-segregationist newspaper that was started by the Reverend Taylor Nightingale and was based at the Beale Street Baptist Church in Memphis. It published articles about racial injustice.

When three friends were lynched in Memphis in 1892, Ida began researching and documenting lynchings throughout the United States. She published her findings in a pamphlet entitled “Southern Horrors: Lynch Laws in All Its Phases”. She continued to write numerous articles about this specific racial injustices suffered by Blacks in the South. In 1896, she founded the National Association of Colored Women, and also founded the National Afro-American Council. Ida formed the Women’s Era Club, the first civic organization for African-American women. This later was named the Ida B. Wells Club, in honor of its founder. Ida was also a founder of the NAACP but was not listed on the original list, although there are conflicting stories to the reason why.

Ida took her anti-lynching campaign to Europe. She took two tours to Europe on her campaign for justice, the first in 1893 and the second in 1894. While she was in Europe she spent her time in both Scotland and England, where she gave many speeches and newspaper interviews mainly about lynching but also about other civil rights issues. She helped catalyze anti-lynching groups in Europe, which tried to press the US to guarantee the safety of blacks in the South.

Ida B. Wells died from kidney failure in 1931.

Dorothy Height

Dorothy Height was an activist widely known for, not only for civil, human and women rights for African Americans in the United States, but also for international communities such as India and South Africa. She was president of the National Council of Negro Women from 1957 to 1977. In 1963, Height was one of the organizers of the famed March on Washington and in 1986, she organized the first Black Family Reunion, a celebration of traditions and values.

Born in Richmond, Virginia in 1912, Dorothy started her career as a social worker. However, after meeting Mary McLeod Bethune and Eleanor Roosevelt, Dorothy volunteered with the National Council of Negro Women and eventually became its president in 1957. She also established Harlem YWCA’s Center for Racial Justice in 1965, which she ran until 1977. In 1963, Height was one of the organizers of the famed March on Washington. Dorothy was a great civil rights activist fighting for equal rights for both African Americans and women. American leaders regularly took her counsel, including First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and Height also encouraged President Dwight D. Eisenhower to desegregate schools and President Lyndon B. Johnson to appoint African-American women to positions in government. Height served on a number of committees, including as a consultant on African affairs to the Secretary of State, the President’s Committee on the Employment of the Handicapped, and the President’s Committee on the Status of Women.

Later in her career, Dorothy focused on strengthening the African-American family. In 1986, she organized the first Black Family Reunion, a celebration of traditions and values. President Bill Clinton awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1994 and, in 2004, President George W. Bush gave her the Congressional Gold Medal.

Dorothy Height died in Washington, D.C. on April 20, 2010 from natural causes.

Click here to take the International Women’s Day Quiz!

Click here to Sponsor the Event

Purchase Tickets Here:

– Tickets $75.00
– VIP Reception $100.00

  • Order using check or money order

Make payable to Black Women for Wellness
P.O. Box 292516
Los Angeles, CA 90029

  • Call 323 290 5955 to order by phone

Adults only (must be 21+ to participate)

Click here to Sponsor the Event

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International Women’s Day Gala & Award Ceremony Sponsorship Levels

February 13 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Champion Title Sponsor – $20,000.00

  • Champion Sponsorship Benefits
    • Center 2 page advertisement in Official Program (each full page 8.5 x 11)
    • Company name and logo identification as Title Sponsor on all printed collateral
    • Company name listed as Title Sponsor in all press releases for event submitted to media
    • Title Sponsor recognition mention on all radio spots promoting event
    • Placement of information and logo on bwwla website
    • Social Media promotion of event sponsorship
    • Banner recognition at event
    • Chef table sponsorship (name/logo display at event)
    • Social media promotion during event
    • Opportunity to supply and distribute promotional materials at event
    • Recognition at the event
    • Opportunity to announce chef & wine pairing
    • 10 VIP tickets to BWW International Women’s Day event

Warrior Title Sponsor – $15,000.00

  • Warrior Sponsorship Benefits
    • Back Cover , Inside Front, or full-Page ad in Official Program (full page 8.5 x 11)
    • Company name and logo identification as Sponsor on all printed collateral
    • Company name listed as Sponsor in all press releases for event submitted to media
    • Sponsor recognition mention on all radio spots promoting event
    • Sponsor Chef table at event (name/logo display at event)
    • Social Media promotion of event sponsorship
    • Opportunity to supply and distribute promotional materials at event
    • Recognition at the event
    • Opportunity to announce chef & wine pairing
    • 8 VIP tickets to BWW International Women’s Day event
    • Placement of information and logo on bwwla website
    • Social media promotion during event

Defender Sponsor $10,000.00

  • Defender Sponsorship Benefits
    • Full page ad in Official Program (8.5 x 11)
    • Company name and logo identification as sponsor on all printed collateral
    • Company name recognition in all press release of event submitted to the media
    • Sponsor Chef table at event (name/logo display at event)
    • Recognition at the event
    • 6 VIP tickets to BWW International Women’s Day event
    • Placement of information and logo on bwwla website
    • Social media promotion during event

Advocate Sponsor $5,000.00

  • Advocate Sponsorship Benefits
    • Half page ad in Official Program (8.5 x 5.5)
    • Company name recognition in press release of event submitted to the media
    • 4 VIP tickets to BWW International Women’s Day event
    • Recognition at the event
    • Placement of information and logo on bwwla website
    • Social media promotion

Ally Sponsor $1,000.00

  • Ally Sponsorship Benefits
    • One quarter page ad in Official Program (4.5 x 5.5)
    • Company name recognition in press releases of event submitted to the media
    • 2 VIP tickets to International Women’s Day event
    • Recognition at the event
    • Placement of information and logo on bwwla website
    • Social media promotion



Complete the form to order a sponsorship:


Please make check payable to:
Black Women for Wellness

Mail to:
International Women’s Day 2014
Black Women for Wellness
P.O. Box 292516, Los Angeles CA 90029
Phone (323) 290-5955

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International Women’s Day Celebration…Every Step We Take

February 5 in Events, News, Press Release by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Global Food paired with International Wines


“Human progress is neither automatic nor inevitable; every step toward the goal of justice requires sacrifice, suffering and struggle. The tireless exertions and passionate concern of dedicated individuals…”
Martin Luther King Jr

Enhancing the health and well being of Black women & girls via advocacy, service and programs more than 16 years with in California.

Enjoy an evening featuring Kitchen Diva chefs offering global cuisines paired with international wines, network with people working locally impacting globally on the issues important to women & girls, support with your donation the work of Black Women for Wellness.

Date:
March 8, 2014 (Saturday)
5:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Location:
Los Angeles Turner Center
8946 Sepulveda Eastway
Los Angeles CA 90045

Cocktail/African/Traditional Attire Requested


Celebrate the Women

Meet the Chefs and Sommelier


Chef Dr. Melvin J. Rivers

BWW International Women's Day 2014 Chefs

Dr. Melvin J. Rivers is the Executive Chef of Presentation Catering-an Upscale Catering Company. He was formally trained by the Sheraton Corporation in Charleston, South Carolina and New Orleans, Louisiana. He has worked for the Sheraton New Orleans Hotel and Towers, The New York Hilton Hotel and Towers, The Atlanta Ritz Carlton and the Atlanta Swissotel, just to name a few. He is an excellent Ice Sculptor and Culinary Artist. Chef Rivers has been featured on “Good Day Atlanta”, “The Peachtree Morning Show” and other programs in South Carolina, Georgia and Texas displaying the Art of Garde Manger. Dr. Rivers holds a Doctor of Business Administration degree from Walden University with a Concentration in Leadership, a Master of Business Administration from DeVry University’s Keller Graduate School of Management and a Bachelor of Science in Technical Management from DeVry University.

Chef Cheryl Tate

Chef Cheryl Tate is a Los Angeles native who grew up in the South Bay Area. Creativity reigns supreme as Chef Cheryl went through many careers to finally become a Culinary Super Star. Graduating from Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts gave her the necessary tools in the competitive industry of professional cooking. She is now a Personal Chef. Chef Cheryl believes food has to nurture the soul. We all eat food; but good food, prepared by someone who cares about you, nurtures the soul. All too often we are consuming food in hurry, not eating properly or taking the time to savor it. Chef Cheryl’s style incorporates lifestyle, taste and nutrition for health.

Chef Donna Barrow

Chef Donna Barrow, Certified Personal Chef and owner of Your Plate or Mine, Inc., has been delighting friends and family with her tasty and mouthwatering cuisine for years. After spending over 20 years in the field of education, Donna has taken her cooking global. She is fortunate
enough to be able to “work”, pursuing her passion in her vocation of choice – preparing delicious home-cooked meals and restaurant-inspired cuisine for individuals, families and small groups. Inspired by her family, Chef Donna has been cooking not only traditional and gourmet fare but yummy and delicious alternatives for those with special dietary needs. A “So Cal Gal” with Louisiana and Mississippi roots, Chef Donna has been refining her culinary crafts into personal versions of California Fusion and Haute Comfort Foods.

Chef Buff Patterson

I’m Buff Patterson, part owner of P Trains California Barbecue. We are a premier catering, specialty sauce and jerky company. We do catering for weddings, corporate parties, birthday parties, festivals, grand openings and a multitude of other large events.I do this in conjunction with my personal training business. We believe food is both nurturing and healing. I’ve been able to incorporate my love for food and fitness into a business that I’ve been to help women transform both the way they look at food and their bodies.

Chef Alexandria

Born and raised in Los Angeles, California, Alexandria is an alumna of Crenshaw High School. Alex started with Black Women for Wellness as an intern for the Kitchen Divas program in March 2013. She is now the Program Coordinator and a Chef Diva. Alex was educated at The California Culinary Academy in San Francisco and is a candidate for Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Culinary Nutrition from Johnson & Wales University, located in Providence, Rhode Island. Alex has a wealth of experience in the food service industry: Culinary Intern for Walt Disney World Resorts in Orlando, Florida; Culinary Nutrition Intern for Athlete’s Performance in Phoenix, Arizona; Chef for Chili Pepper Events in San Francisco, California. Alex is the CEO and Founder of her own chef service Better Taste Productions.

Sommelier Charlie Puffer

Charlie Puffer has been a food/beverage/hospitality professional for 25 years. He is currently a consultant in fine wine and spirits, specializing in private events, wine education, and restaurant wine list development. He grew up on the south side of Chicago, and is very happy to be living in Los Angeles.

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Sisters @ Eight – Celebrating Black Love – February 14, 2014 8:30 am – 10:30 am

February 5 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Black Love is more than a romantic notion – it is a cultural affirmation and building foundation for our future

Black love starts with self love of the inner core of who we are and who you are – and it needs reinforcement from our people and is totally supported with love from our relationships.

Black love creates, maintains, restores and is cultivated by relationship with parents, with siblings, with lovers & partners with friends and colleagues.

Black Love is critical for community and being in love with our people, our land (Africa) neighborhoods and spaces, our culture and the organizations that really love us is critical to loving ourselves.

Black Love is reciprocal and cyclical and our question is how do we reinforce Black love? Have we broken the cycle and stopped the reciprocity? If so how do we amend and redirect? Do we recognize Black love in its many forms or are we acknowledging impostors, are we suffering the impacts of minimum Black Love, are we maximizing our potentials of Black love?

Join Black Women for Wellness as we celebrate and dialog on Black Love – not your typical conversation, not exploitive, not find you a man (or woman), not blaming, no shame, not about your sexual relationship, simply building a platform that affirms our selves and community to move forward into the future in love with Black people.

Without Black Love, our future is questionable, in danger and not guaranteed. Black Love is critical, necessary and vital to our survival. It is the passion, glue, need, desire, defense and work toward our health and well being.

<h2>Location: DWP 4030 Crenshaw Blvd Los Angeles CA 90008</h2>

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Get Covered! Affordable Healthcare Fair, December 7, 12PM – 4PM

December 11 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Black Women for Wellness - Sisters with Options

Join Sisters with Options and The Village Health Foundation for Affordable Care Act 101 and Enrollment Fair.

We have the answers to the questions you should be asking about the Affordable Care Act and learn how to enroll in the new health care options available through Covered California.

Save The Date!

Date:  Saturday, December 7, 2013
Time:  12PM – 4PM
Location:  Village Health Foundation
4075 W Pico Blvd
Los Angeles CA 90019

Covered California Certified Enrollment Counselors will be available to help you enroll on the spot!

If you plan to enroll at this event, please make sure to bring:

  • Proof of your identity
  • Proof of income
  • Proof of California Address
  • Proof of your citizenship or immigration status
  • Social Security Card

December 23rd is the deadline to enroll for coverage effective January 1, 2014

If you have questions, please contact Sandi at 323-290-5955 or email sandi@bwwla.com

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Healthy Cooking, Canning & Gifts

December 6 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Black Women for Wellness Healthy Cooking

Dates: December 10th & 17th
Location: LA Care
3111 W. Century Blvd. Ste. 100
Los Angeles, CA 90303

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Healthy Holiday Alternatives Series

December 6 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Black Women for Wellness Healthy Holiday Series

Dates: December 12th
Location: Ascension Lutheran Church
5820 W. Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90043

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Get Smart B4U Get Sexy – Peer Advocate& Leadership Training – December 14

December 3 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Black Women for Wellness - Get Smart B4 U Get Sexy!

Black Women for Wellness recognizes the deep commitment African American and Black women have made to the electoral process, we organize, mobilize and vote. In recognition of this commitment, Black Women for Wellness is convening a series of workshops and trainings for Black women & girls who have demonstrated an interest in increasing our involvement and engagement with the political systems that set and determine policies and resources that impact our lives. BWW is seeking women interested in leadership roles, elected office and appointments who are ready to speak truth to power as advocates for Black women & girls.

Given our communities’ continuing health disparities, BWW is seeking the next generation of advocates, women, girls and men that are committed to working within our community to affect change. Tools for building a campaign, media communications, integrating reproductive justice values with social justice and civic engagement organizations plus supporting policy changes both in the legislative and administrative policies will be shared.

Date: Friday, December 14, 2013

We are now accepting applications ($10.00 fee). Space is limited! You can find a copy of the application below!

Contact Onyenma Obiekea for further questions by email: onyenma@bwwla.com or by phone: 323.290.5955

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Sisters @ Eight – HIV/AIDS Status of African American Women, December 13, 2013

December 3 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Black Women for Wellness - Sisters @ Eight

HIV/AIDS Status of African American & Black Women

December 1st marks World AIDS Day, so BWW has dedicated the upcoming Sisters @ 8 to the topic of HIV/AIDS as it impacts our community. BWW will have a wonderful panel of experts to share current research, statistics, as well as the current status of HIV/AIDS in our community!

Date: Friday, December 13, 2013
Time: 8:30am – 10:30am
Location: TBD

To RSVP and for any questions, contact us at 323.290.5955

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Black Women for Wellness Sweet Sixteen Birthday Fundraiser

December 2 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Black Women for Wellness - Sweet Sixteen Birthday Fundraiser

We are asking you to join the celebration and help us commemorate our Super 16 in style by donating $16.00 to Black Women for Wellness – $1 per year for an amazing 16 years of service to and with Black Women and girls.

Black Women Wellness Sweet Sixteen Fundraiser

So what have we been up to you ask? Great question! Here are 10 reasons to celebrate:

10. BWW organizes black hair stylists and nail technicians that travel to Washington D.C. helping pass legislation removing harmful chemicals that cause reproductive and neurological development disorders out of our beauty products. (Environmental Justice)

9) BWW is conducting research examining the impacts of black hair care products on our physical health. Currently interns from Charles Drew University are in the field (Crenshaw area) gathering data to include additional community input for a more comprehensive picture.
(Perfectly Natural –Environmental Justice)

8) BWW passed AB1319, a landmark BPA bill that removed BPA from baby bottles and sippy cups in California. We also passed/sponsored legislation that increases reproductive health access to millions of California women, including birth control and HIV testing. (Sisters in Control Reproductive Justice)

7) BWW has literally served over 30,000 women & girls offering food demonstrations, cooking classes and/or refreshments at health fairs, conferences, festivals and community events. (Sisters in Motion/Kitchen Divas)

6) BWW provides free lifestyle coaching to guide community members with changing their lifestyles to prevent Type 2 Diabetes through nutrition, physical activity, social support and affirmations of the positive traditions and adjustment with no do good habits. (National Diabetes Prevention Program)

5) BWW publishes health education, civic engagement and general information to keep community members informed on our health status, propositions and policies impacts Black women and girls. BWW registers voters, phone banks, table and canvas to Get Out the Vote and turn up our voices. (Civic Engagement)

4) BWW trains peer advocates to empower, educate and inform young women and girls with shifting knowledge behavior and attitudes surrounding sex. Making smart sexy and sex smart is the model of our Get Smarty B4U Get Sexy team, tackling the rampant sexually transmitted infections rates of African American youth. (Get Smart B4U Get Sexy)

3) Sisters with Options is the newest Black Women for Wellness program, having already outreached to and educated over 300 community members on the Affordable Care Act and Covered California. (Chocolate Covered).

2) In 2013, BWW educated more than 50 men and women on colon cancer screening and empowered them with the information to take control and possibly save their lives. (EPICS – Educational Program to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screenings)

1) We are the only Black women health organization holding down policy in California.

We’re proud of our accomplishments, however importantly; we are focused on the future. Black Women for Wellness plans to keep working, with your help! We are asking you to donate at least $16 dollars for our 16 years of service, advocacy, leadership, education, research, organizing and fighting for and on the behalf of Black women and girls.

Think of it as taking us out to lunch for our birthday!

Black Women Wellness Sweet Sixteen Fundraiser

Sincerely,
Black Women for Wellness

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December 21, 2013 Winter Solstice

December 2 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Fun, Festivals, Food, Rituals, Music, and Conversation! 4PM – 7PM @ the BWW Office 4340 11th Ave, Los Angeles

RSVP (323) 290-5955

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Respect Us (2010)

October 2 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Health Disparities Fashion Show participants included:

Sylvia Drew Ivie, Andria Hancock Crear, Denishia Clark, Ricky Marshall, Erika Gist Seiver, Leslie Trotter, Samantha Wheeler, Tony Wafford, Jackie Provost

At the Respect Us conference, Black Women for Wellness released its Manifesto for Reproductive Justice, sharing an historical analysis and definition of reproductive justice and reproductive health for Black women in America, with the introduction of the first data set highlighting the reproductive health status of Black women in Los Angeles County.

The manifesto and data set served as background for a lively discussion on current and proposed policy impacting access, affordability and appropriateness for African American women & girls seeking reproductive health care. Highlights of Respect Us included a health disparity fashion show as a visual representation of health disparities experienced by African American community members.  The conference focused on utilizing leadership development, policy advocacy, research, and alliance building to eliminate disparities.

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Respect! Inclusion with Integrity of African American Women (2009)

October 2 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Keynote Speakers: Professor Vernellia Randall, Dr. Gail Wyatt, Loretta Ross, & Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis

Respect conference defined reproductive justice as a basic human right. Taking a look at policy, both administrative and legislative impacting access to reproductive education, health services and treatment. Importantly Respect sought to share insights with health care professionals, community advocates and leadership on how to maintain integrity of services when serving many cultures, ethnicity and ages, define cultural competency for African American and Black women & girls, implement tools that grade and measure cultural appropriateness as well share models of success demonstrating care for Black women and girls. Respect conference attendees discussed solutions to help reduce epidemic sexually transmitted infections among African American girls while ensuring that young women in our community are treated with integrity and respect. The information shared at the Respect conference was a resource and tool to garner support towards reducing health disparities in the African American community that specifically target our women.

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Serious Business: Defining Agenda, Allies & Direction (2008)

October 2 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Keynote Speaker:  Rev. Daniel Buford

Additional Speakers: Melissa Mills, Melisa Price, Jessica Counts Arnold, Shikana Temille Porter, Melissa Anderson, Cleo Manago, Jackie Provost, Elani Negussie, Shaunelle Curry, Valerie Reed, Errol Parker, Annitra Ravenmoon, Mesbel Mohamoud, Charlene Davis, Albert Neal, Mona Gekanku Toeque, Purusha Hickson, Erika Gist-Seiver,  Pauline Brooks, Tyronne Hayes

Synopsis:

Serious Business sharpen our lens with tools to identify the combined impact of racism and sexism on the reproductive status of women & girls. Taking into consideration the socio economic status, educational levels inside our communities, the class divisions and colorisms, conference participants were able to gather information and tools, support and affirmation on confronting the systematic barriers and challenges to reproductive choice, and basic human rights. Advocacy and community social responsibility were strong tenets of conversation at Serious Business.

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Woman 2 Woman II: Old School to Hip Hop (2007)

October 2 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Erylene Piper Mandy, Ph.D

Additional Speakers: Dr Nina Harawa, Jamie Brooks, David Johnson, Erika Gist-Siever, Peter J Harris, Dr Shikana Temille Porter, Melanie Hedgemon, Kali Alexander, Loretta Jones, Robin Johnson MD, Felicia Eaves, Cynthia Davis, Dr Tyronne Hayes, Carmen Morgan, Julie Grigsby, Mark Wakabayash, Thandisize Chimurenga, Lola Sablan Santo, Moza Cooper, Namuyaba Temanju, Martha Dina Arguella, LaVonna Lewis Blair, Robyn M McGee, Adrianne Black

Synopsis:

Woman 2 Woman II brought Ol School to Hip Hop generations to the table sharing lessons and lives, experience and innovation with navigating our sexual lives. Women & men gathered in discussion on reproductive health disparities negative affect on our overall health and well being. Panel discussions on Sexually Transmitted Infections, Environmental Justice in Reproductive Health, and Healthy Relationships between women & men were front and center. The keynote address by Dr. Piper Mandy shared lessons for across the generational divide of old school women and the hip hop generation.  There were also workshops on Today’s Birth Control Methods, Teen Sexuality, and Beautiful Black Babies. With the information that attendees received from the discussions, women were empowered to raise awareness, take action, and advocate for our reproductive health as black women.

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Woman 2 Woman (2006)

October 2 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Keynote Speakers: Loretta Ross & Erylene Piper Mandy

Additional Speakers: Dazon Dixon, Adjoa Jones, Toni Bond, Emma Fredu, Kali Alexander, Dazon Dixon Diablo, Melanie Hedgemon, Rosita Romero, Azeb Tadesse, Sakinah Carter, Carmen Morgan

In conjunction with SisterSong national conference, Woman 2 Woman offered a space for African American & Black reproductive justice advocates and health care professionals to   focus on the reproductive health status of Black women in specific. Panels were held to help define reproductive justice and cultural competence as well as update those present on reproductive health technology. Some of the topics discussed were on fibroids and black women and holistic approaches to reproductive health. One of the highlights of the conference was the panel of African, Caribbean, and Latino Black women that showed the different perspectives and representations of all Black women.

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Where’s the Love, Where’s the Money?: Sex, Sexuality, Intimacy & Love – Political Acts Among African Americans (2003)

October 2 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Keynote Speakers: Alicia Dixon, M.P.H. & Keisha Carr Paxton, Ph.D.

Synopsis:

Beginning with Speed Dating the day before, Where’s the Love, Where’s the Money was Black Women for Wellness’s conference discussing issues related to the large number of African American women who are HIV+. In regards to love, the topic explored related to the confusion between love and sex that may contribute to the high rate of unprotected sex in the black community. Additionally, the importance of money was discussed for the purpose of having resources for HIV/AIDS prevention efforts among women, but more specifically among Black women.

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Whose Womb Is this? (2002)

October 2 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Keynote Speaker: Toni Guy

Additional Speakers & Presenters: Ms Latonya Slack (California Black Women’s Health Project), Marjorie Sims (California Women’s Law Center), Nana Gymafi, Allison Moore, Jenny Lam, Andria Hancock Crear, Dozella Lee, Phyllis Paxton, Dr Shereen Beverly, Akua Jitahadi, Loretta Jones, Muadi Mukenga, Norette, Nduwayo, Rosemary Spriggs, and Ann Hamon

Synopsis:

At Whose Womb Is This?, Black Women for Wellness celebrated International Women’s Day with African American and immigrant Black women throughout the Los Angeles area. Attendees were given information and access to networks to take action in support of black women who seek health services. The overall goal of Whose Womb Is This was to equip Black women with the tools needed to increase awareness and create change for their reproductive health.

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Kindred Sisters…Healing Words (2001)

October 2 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Keynote Speakers: Bertie Howard & Dr. Denese Shervington, M.D., M.P.H.

Synopsis:

Kindred Sisters…Healing Words, Black Women for Wellness’s International Women’s Day Conference, was centered on improving our overall health together as black women. There were discussions that shared with attendees solutions and strategies of HIV prevention, why HIV disproportionately affects us as black women, and how to define our own reproductive liberty. Those present learned how to do breast and vaginal self-exams, information concerning when to schedule woman exams, and exercise activities to increase our physical fitness. This equipped us with tools necessary to live healthier lives.

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Birth Stories: Black Infant Mortality, Closing the Gap (1999)

October 2 in Events by Kristina Meyers No Comments

Keynote Speakers: Kathryn Hall, Milton Lee, Dr. Kim Gregory, & Linda Janet Holmes

Synopsis:

At Birth Stories, Black Women for Wellness’s 1999 conference, topics explored included “Black Infant Mortality…. Options for Closing the Gap,” “The History of Black Infant Health and Granny Midwives in the South,” and “How Racism & Sexism Have Impacted a Woman’s Decision & Quality of Care.” Conference participants increased their ability to identify the effects of racism on perinatal care and childbearing decisions, effective perinatal care models for Black women in California, and strategies for addressing the health of pregnant Black women from a holistic perspective. With this information, attendees were equipped with knowledge to help reduce health disparities related to childbirth.

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Mother’s Day Tea Fundraiser, Saturday, May 5, 2012 2-5 pm FREE

April 21 in Events, Press Release by admin No Comments

This year’s event is FREE! Bring your wallets and pocketbooks though, as the day promises to be a fun event!! We ask that you RSVP (by emailing fundraising[at]bwwla.com or calling 323.290.5955) so that we may have an accurate headcount for our healthy food offerings prepared by our Kitchen Divas!

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Reproductive Freedom Day

February 28 in Events by Nourbese No Comments

Every spring during the state’s legislative Lobby Period the California Coalition for Reproductive Freedom organizes a day-long event for member organizations. On this day hundreds of reproductive health advocates speak to their legislative representatives and staff, lobbying for polices to improve the lives of women and families. Black Women for Wellness, a coalition participant for the past three years, has continually increased the presence of Black women and men on Lobby Day. Last year, partnering with Great Beginnings for Black Babies BWW brought 17 delegates, some advocating for the first time, to address how state budget cuts would strip our communities of the resources needed to survive.

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Reproductive Justice Advocacy Training Day!

February 24 in Events, News by Nourbese No Comments

We all have personal and community concerns and now is your opportunity to learn how to voice them! In preparation for a day of lobbying in Sacramento Black Women for W…ellness and the Reproductive Justice Coalition of Los Angeles are organizing an advocacy training workshop.

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Join Planned Parenthood Los Angeles , Rep. Judy Chu and Rep. Xavier Becerra to speak out in support of women’s health.

February 23 in Events, National Diabetes Prevention Program by Nourbese No Comments

Last week the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Pence bill to bar Planned Parenthood from receiving federal funds for any purpose, including providing basic primary and lifesaving preventive health care to women and families. Millions of Americans rely on Planned Parenthood for primary and preventive health care, including lifesaving breast and cervical cancer screenings, annual exams, family planning visits, birth control, HIV testing, and more. In Los Angeles alone, Planned Parenthood provides care to over 120,000 women, men and teens each year through 17 health centers.

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March 5th Advocacy Training

January 8 in Events, National Diabetes Prevention Program by Nourbese No Comments

Ever wondered how a bill becomes a law or maybe you thought about speaking to a legislative representative or perhaps you have concerns for the way health laws are instituted. We all have personal and community concerns now is your opportunity to learn how to voice them! In preparation for a day of lobbying in Sacramento Black Women for Wellness and the Reproductive Justice Coalition of Los Angeles are organizing a half day advocacy training workshop.

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Struttin Sole Sista’s on the move!

December 29 in Events, Keep In Touch by admin No Comments

YEAH!!! It’s that time of the year again. To Walk for the Cause & to Build New Friendships while at the same time getting that daily exercise in… what fun! Black Women for Wellness participated last year and we want to double our team participation this year. Come on out and join us. Just follow the link below to participate.

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